Anthropology Dropout
Anthropology escaped its captor, the ivory tower.
Anthropology Dropout
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wanderingdeliberately:

Tian Yi for Elle Vietnam (May 2013)
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nonzencom:

Modern Weekly China Lifestyle Section, February 22, 2014
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actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
actuallygrimes:

nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)

cool
13 Things That Americans Do That The Rest Of The World Just Finds Bizarre
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At the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition of 1909 in Seattle:
"A month old orphaned boy named Ernest was raffled away as a prize. Although a winning ticket was drawn, nobody claimed the prize. The ultimate destiny of the child is still being investigated." 
Source
Ancient African Coins Found In Australia Could Rewrite History
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BORNHOLM, DENMARK—A gold figurine, standing just over one-and-a-half inches in height, was found recently in a field on Danish island of Bornholm. The figure is the fifth such item found in the area since 2009, and is unique among the set in that it is the only one that depicts a woman. That makes the figurine uncommon for art of its age, which is believed to be A.D. sixth century during the Nordic Iron Age. The gold woman, which weighs a tenth of an ounce and is thought to be a fertility idol, is depicted arched backward with her arms bound behind.
Source
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Tichkematse demonstrating Plains sign language for Frank Hamilton Cushing.  The wig he is wearing for this photograph was apparently intended to make Tichkematse look “authentic.”  Photo Lot 24. Neg. 46,601.
Source
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Iggy Pop performing ‘The Passenger’ from Lust for Life (1977)
Anthropology topics: subculture, drug culture, ritual, performance, rites of passage, trance state, shamanic voyage, ethnomusicology
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